Reviews

Review by New Folk Sounds (NL)

Hans van Deelen wrote a great review about our new album Seven White Horses for the Dutch digital magazine New Folk Sounds. Check it out!

You can find the review in Dutch at newfolksounds.nl or read the translation here:

Boxin’ The Vox – Seven white horses

Boxin’ The Vox is a duo from the village De Kwakel and consists of Anne-Lotte Paymans (vocals, guitar) and David Plasmeijer (vocals and banjo, but on the cd also lute, electric guitar, bass and drums). The couple have Irish music as their basis, on which they leave their own mark. With Seven white horses they release their second cd, which contains ten self-written songs. Their first CD, Take me home, contained not only Irish standards, but also a translation of the Boudewijn de Groot song Vondeling van Ameland.

On their new CD Anne-Lotte and David receive musical support from Adam Shapiro (fiddle), Jon O’Connell (double bass, both playing in The Fiddle Case), Dave Munnelly (accordion) and Janos Koolen (mandolin). Truly an excellent backing. The latter also took care of the sound mix and mastering of the recordings, which were made in his own Studio Doornenburg.

Opener Seven White Horses joins the legend about the arrival of St. Patrick in Ireland and the fury of seven mythical kings about it. In Mr Alzheimer’s they ask him to leave his memories alone. Boxin’ The Vox has started an action to raise money against the disease and donates all proceeds of the song. The subject of Alzheimer’s plays in the immediate vicinity of one of the group members.

Ballads and more up-tempo songs are alternated. The Whiskey War is an excellent sing-along if you have heard the lyrics a few times, and deals with a real conflict between Canada and Denmark. A nice ballad is An Isiltir, of which the lyrics are mostly in English. It deals with the Kerry Mountains and the Atlantic Ocean. Before You Depart is a fitting ending to the CD, which shows that Boxin’ The Vox has pawned its heart on the green island. You can almost hear them wishing they were Irish.

Review by Hans van Deelen for New Folk Sounds

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